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By Georgetta L. Morque

A familiar face reporting the news on Channel 12 is none other than Richard Giacovas, Rye High School class of 2009 and Iona College class of 2013. In less than three years, he has worked his way up to producer and on-air reporter. His days are fast-paced and action-packed and as Giacovas says, “The news never stops.”

 

His job is also a dream-come-true. “For as long as I can remember, I always wanted to be on TV,” said Giacovas, who recalls watching the 5 o’clock news regularly growing up. It wasn’t until junior year at Rye High that he was able to channel his passion in a video journalism class. After learning the fundamentals of newscasting, Giacovas began delivering the school’s announcements as a morning news anchor.

 

“Richard emerged almost immediately as someone who had been a news anchor in a previous life. He was THAT good,” said Vince Baione, who created and taught the Video Journalism class. “He wasn’t a “student doing the news,” he was an anchor doing his “job”. It comes as no surprise to anyone who saw him that he would end up in broadcasting. He was born with a mike in his hand.” Michael Limone, who also taught the class, agrees. “Richard was amazing to watch each morning. When he was our morning anchor, he set the bar high for the kids who followed him. Everyone wanted to be the next ‘Richard Giacovas’. We are so proud of his success.”

 

As a mass communications major at Iona, Giacovas worked at his craft and was instrumental in building up the college’s TV station. He also interned with WNBC, gaining hands-on experience in writing and editing, as well as the opportunity to sit in on meetings with producers. Aspiring television news journalists typically relocate after college to prove themselves, explained Giacovas, who instead decided to try his luck in New York. Landing at News 12, he paid his dues as a part-time freelance associate producer working the 2:30 to 11:30 a.m. shift, which left little time for sleep. Yet, News 12 was open to Giacovas’s interest in on-air reporting and he got his chance with his first interview with Dr. Susan Blum of the Blum Institute in Rye Brook, which was a success.  

 

Currently he works both behind the scenes producing two back-to-back evening news shows and does his own reporting. Of the challenges and pressures from deadlines and breaking news, Giacovas says he’s versatile and driving him is his passion for the work. He feels blessed by the great people at News 12 who have been mentors. 

 

He’s interviewed celebrities, including Carol Burnett and John Stamos, covered breaking news, including the Memorial Day vintage plane crash in the Hudson River, and has been co-host of New Year’s Eve in White Plains. One story closer to home and to the heart was the last day of the Rye Smoke Shop. Despite his busy schedule, he lends his time and his voice as a lector at Church of the Resurrection, which he has been doing since high school. 

 

Giacovas, the recipient of the 2015 Business Council of Westchester’s Rising Stars 40 Under 40 award, is on his way. 

 

 


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