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By Bill Lawyer

In recent months people involved with improving Rye’s resilience to serious storms have expressed concern that the Rye Rising projects that were initiated are “going nowhere.” Further, the City may lose funds that were awarded by New York State due to failure to meet deadlines spelled out in the contract, which expires in 2019.

But before looking at recent developments, some background information is needed to help understand what’s at stake.

It’s been ten years since two serious floods took place in 2007. Then along came Hurricane Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012. Following each of these disasters people looked to government to help — not only with cleanup, repair, and restoration, but also with designing structures and infrastructures that were more resilient — for the inevitable storms that would arrive in the years to come.

Committees were formed and inter-municipal studies, watershed-wide in scope, were begun. Rye was greatly impacted by the rainfall in the upper Blind Brook watershed, where the amount of impervious surfaces has greatly increased in recent years, due mainly to the construction of new homes, office buildings, and roadways.

But Rye wasn’t the only Westchester community to seek help with the serious damage from the rising tides and inundated streams and rivers.

After the 2007 storms, Westchester County developed a special fund for municipalities that had viable projects for diminishing the impact of storms.

Fortunately, Rye had been involved with the Long Island Sound Watershed Intermunicipal Council (LISWIC) for many years and was ready to move forward.

Rye was one of the first to be awarded funds, which were used to restore the sluicegate at the Bowman Avenue Dam on Blind Brook.

A committee of residents, many of whom lived in and adjacent to Indian Village, was established to assist the Rye City Council in identifying and prioritizing improvement projects.

Over the years, Rye has participated in several projects to stop damage caused by storm-water runoff. These include planting trees and shrubs and expanding wetlands to retain rainfall, and the installation of dry well equipment.

After Irene and Sandy, New York State developed a new program for resiliency improvements, New York Rising, and the City of Rye submitted a proposal.

 

The Rye City Lions Club invites nominations of deserving individuals to receive the James A. and Marian M. Shea Community Service Award. Established in 2003, the Award recognizes an individual who lives or works in Rye and has contributed to improving the lives of its citizens by volunteering services of an outstanding nature.

Nomination forms may be obtained via the Club’s website, www.e-clubhouse.org/sites/ryecityny. Mail completed forms by September 22 to the Rye City Lions Club, P.O. Box 354, Rye, NY 10580. The award will be presented at the Club’s annual Charter Dinner on November 17 at Apawamis Club.

 

 

By Caitlin Brown

 

 

For lovers of small plates, handcrafted cocktails, and wood-fired sides, Village Social Kitchen is the dining destination in downtown Rye. 

 

The vibe is low-key but hip, and there is a bustling crowd, both at the bar, which serves a full menu (and has two large TVs for sports lovers wanting to catch a game), and in the main dining room, which includes outdoor seating for those wanting to enjoy al fresco dining and people watching. 

 

Owner Joe Bueti’s vision was to recreate a city gastropub with contemporary comfort food and a neighborhood feel. Mogan Anthony, who worked at various Jean Georges establishments before becoming executive chef of Bueti’s restaurant group, describes the menu as veggie-centric and Japanese-inspired. And in a few short months, Chef Alex Aparicio, formerly of Dove Tail, Avant Garden, and Bobby Flay, has attracted a big following.  

 

We had a hard time choosing among the starters, so we asked our waiter for his recommendations. We shared the popular Avocado Toast (the combination of creamy burrata, avocado, and pea pesto is divine) and the sinfully good Bacon Dumplings. The Social Wings, with Vietnamese lime glaze, are a heavenly alternative to the standard Buffalo Wings bar fare. We couldn’t resist trying the Salty Pretzel Tuna, as it sounded, well, different. It made out taste buds sing with its juxtaposition of cool and hot, spicy and delicate, and lots of crunch.

 

For those who can’t get enough organic vegetables, try the Roasted Beets with grapefruit, sunflower seeds, and horseradish yogurt, or the Mother’s Grain Salad of arugula, wheat berries, quinoa, cucumber, hazelnuts, and more tossed with yogurt vinaigrette.

 

The Wood-Fired Corn on the Cob and the Crispy Artichokes bring new meaning to Sides and Vegetables.

 

For the main course, Village Social offers a range of fish, pasta, meat, and poultry dishes. Try the Seafood Fettucini with Calabrian chili, Izakaya Tuna with a tamarind glaze and served with ginger rice, Charred Skirt Steak, or Grilled Berkshire Pork Chop. 

 

If you’re bringing the kids, they’ll be thrilled with a Kobe Beef Hot Dog, Short Rib Grilled Cheese, or the Dare Devil Pizza.

 

In addition to a small but fine wine selection, they mix up handcrafted cocktails with names like No Brainer (gin, cucumber, mint) and Manhattan on Tap.  

 

One of the best things about Village Social, aside from its culinary creations, reasonable prices, and topnotch service, is that they installed soundproofing. It’s one of the few popular restaurants where you can carry on a conversation with your dinner partner.

 

Village Social, located at 67 Purchase Street, is open for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. To make a reservation, call 612-4267. 

 

 

Photos by Pedro Garcia

 

 

Leaders of Tomorrow and the Rye Recreation Department invite you to SUMMERFEST, the 24th Annual Field Day of Fun for Kids of All Ages, on Sunday, September 23. The fun begins with the Jack Curran Memorial Bare-Handed Baseball Game at 3. The Jack Nye Memorial Ice Tea Family Tennis Tournament and the races and contests start at 3:30.

Test your skills at the Water Balloon Challenge, the Bean Bag Toss, and the Golf Challenge. Take part in the Potato-Sack Race, the 30-Yard Dash, and the Peanut Scramble. You may not win the Ice Cream Eating Contest, but you’ll have a smile on your face.

Enjoy catching up with new neighbors and old over hot dogs from Kelly’s. Toast the annual honoree. The John Carey Jr. Memorial Music Program begins at 5.

By Caitlin Brown

For lovers of small plates, handcrafted cocktails, and wood-fired sides, Village Social Kitchen is the dining destination in downtown Rye.

The vibe is low-key but hip, and there is a bustling crowd, both at the bar, which serves a full menu (and has two large TVs for sports lovers wanting to catch a game), and in the main dining room, which includes outdoor seating for those wanting to enjoy al fresco dining and people watching.

Owner Joe Bueti’s vision was to recreate a city gastropub with contemporary comfort food and a neighborhood feel. Mogan Anthony, who worked at various Jean Georges establishments before becoming executive chef of Bueti’s restaurant group, describes the menu as veggie-centric and Japanese-inspired. And in a few short months, Chef Alex Aparicio, formerly of Dove Tail, Avant Garden, and Bobby Flay, has attracted a big following.

We had a hard time choosing among the starters, so we asked our waiter for his recommendations. We shared the popular Avocado Toast (the combination of creamy burrata, avocado, and pea pesto is divine) and the sinfully good Bacon Dumplings. The Social Wings, with Vietnamese lime glaze, are a heavenly alternative to the standard Buffalo Wings bar fare. We couldn’t resist trying the Salty Pretzel Tuna, as it sounded, well, different. It made out taste buds sing with its juxtaposition of cool and hot, spicy and delicate, and lots of crunch.

For those who can’t get enough organic vegetables, try the Roasted Beets with grapefruit, sunflower seeds, and horseradish yogurt, or the Mother’s Grain Salad of arugula, wheat berries, quinoa, cucumber, hazelnuts, and more tossed with yogurt vinaigrette.

The Wood-Fired Corn on the Cob and the Crispy Artichokes bring new meaning to Sides and Vegetables.

For the main course, Village Social offers a range of fish, pasta, meat, and poultry dishes. Try the Seafood Fettucini with Calabrian chili, Izakaya Tuna with a tamarind glaze and served with ginger rice, Charred Skirt Steak, or Grilled Berkshire Pork Chop.

If you’re bringing the kids, they’ll be thrilled with a Kobe Beef Hot Dog, Short Rib Grilled Cheese, or the Dare Devil Pizza.

In addition to a small but fine wine selection, they mix up handcrafted cocktails with names like No Brainer (gin, cucumber, mint) and Manhattan on Tap.

One of the best things about Village Social, aside from its culinary creations, reasonable prices, and topnotch service, is that they installed soundproofing. It’s one of the few popular restaurants where you can carry on a conversation with your dinner partner.

Village Social, located at 67 Purchase Street, is open for lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. To make a reservation, call 612-4267.

Photos by Pedro Garcia

Open for Business

By Janice Llanes Fabry

Named for the Goldilocks’ Three Bears, Three Gōms in Korean, has something for papa bear, mama bear, and the kids. The shop, at 15 Purchase Street, is just right for back-to-school essentials that are snazzier than what students typically find.

As owner Paul Kim noted, “The composition notebooks I carry have great designs. The Decomposition books are made with recycled paper and soy-based ink. Even the variety of pens are unique and interesting, like all the things in my store.”

Kim, whose flagship store is located in Larchmont, carries erasable pens, pens with pressure ink barrels that enable one to write upside down, pens that dry glossy, and 4-color pens with a variety of color cartridges to choose from. On hand are unbreakable mechanical pencils, staple-less staplers, correction tapes in rare widths, and themed clips and pencil cases. Kim’s repertoire also includes miniature stuffed animals/mascots to embellish school backpacks.

Like most of the merchandise, these Miffy bunnies, Rilakkuma bears, and Sumikko Gurashi plush lines are imported from Asia and are available in different sizes. They originated from Japanese animation and have captured the hearts of kids everywhere, much like the Hello Kitty character created by a Japanese artist in the 1970s. Also highly popular are Three Gōms’ figurines and collectibles.

“When I first opened the Larchmont store, I was surprised at the reaction,” admitted Kim. “I thought I’d have a hard time introducing the merchandise to the community, but the kids all knew what I had because they’ve seen the items on YouTube. Here in Rye, I’ve had the same reaction.”

Salesperson Helen Tornese agrees, “It’s so nice to see how happy and excited the kids get because they’re getting something they love. They even take selfies with the merchandise to post on Facebook.”

It was a toy collectible, a cartoon-style representation of a bear, that initially inspired Kim to set up shop. “As a Bearbrick collector, I discovered that there are hardly any stores on the east coast that carry them. In Asia, these items are so popular that they have to be pre-ordered and are gone by the time they hit the shelves,” he explained. “I decided to put all the collectibles, plush lines, toys, gift items, and stationery items that are so popular in Asia in one store.”

Many of the collectibles that Kim carries are limited editions that cost anywhere between $50 and $700. In addition to Bearbrick, he offers Kidrobot vinyl art toys, produced in limited numbers as well. They’re also available in Blind Boxes, small containers of tiny art toys and figurine collectibles, whose identities are discovered only upon buying and opening.

They certainly are a big hit with the young set, as are Three Gōms’ Gundam animated robot building sets and the challenging Hanayama metal brainteasers and puzzles. Rye Middle School seventh graders couldn’t get enough of them.


“I like the puzzles, because they make you think and they’re really fun,” said Matty Clarke.

“I really like the whole store,” added his buddy Max Greenspan. “It’s got great things for my room.”

As for papa bear and mama bear, Three Gōms carries pretty nifty gift items. A Tea Fisherman, for instance, holds one’s tea bag while it seeps. If wine is the beverage of choice, novelty wine markers in the shape of hedgehogs and pug dogs will hang over one’s glass. Other novelty artifacts include Foodie Gardens for growing tomato, basil, and peppers, as well as Eggling Crack and Grow that hatches a plant before one’s eyes.

The store also offers extra special balloon gift-wrapping at no charge. Three Gōms’ is open Monday through Saturday from 10-6.

 

Plush lines at Three Gōms’

Among the Vinyl collectibles

Rye Neck Middle School seventh-grade customers Matty Clarke and Max Greenspan

Plush lines at Three Gōms’

 

Among the Vinyl collectibles