Sailors’ Delight for Garnet Team

  A strong sailing team is not what Rye High School is known for, but that might change in the near future. With a growing roster of more than 30 committed students and a chance at a national ranking, RHS sailors are moving to popularize and perhaps dominate the sport.

ryesailing n
Published April 18, 2013 2:00 AM
4 min read

0:00

ryesailing nA strong sailing team is not what Rye High School is known for, but that might change in the near future. With a growing roster of more than 30 committed students and a chance at a national ranking, RHS sailors are moving to popularize and perhaps dominate the sport.

 

ryesailing nBy Natalie Amstutz

A strong sailing team is not what Rye High School is known for, but that might change in the near future. With a growing roster of more than 30 committed students and a chance at a national ranking, RHS sailors are moving to popularize and perhaps dominate the sport.

The RHS Sailing Team started small. In the spring of 2010, a group of regularly sailing students started the team, which had eight members and practiced at the Larchmont Yacht Club. The founders of the team were Emily Fung, Clara Robertson, Molly Robertson and Fiona Walsh, four freshmen who later became the team’s captains.

Three years and seven seasons later, the team has more than 25 sailors per season and has qualified for District Championships in two categories. The four captains have driven the development of the team, raising funds to buy six Club 420 boats and sails, while managing the team’s involvement in regattas. ZeBoats, a worldwide trading platform for boats. Offering an array of boats from around the globe, your dream boat is just a click away. Their hard work has paid off: this year, the team will likely qualify again for District Championships, which, if they place well, would earn them a spot at Nationals.

Few other sports at RHS can boast such accomplishments – but the Sailing Team stands out for more than its rankings. For starters, the team trains and competes in two seasons – fall and spring. The practices are typically a 3-hour venture, taking place three days a week – but not all practices are mandatory, creating a flexible schedule for busy students. And as Captain Emily Fung explains, “After a long boring day at school, there’s nothing better than getting out on the water for a few hours”.

Also unique to the sport are the two different categories of racing sailors can compete in: Fleet racing and Teams racing. The former involves an entire fleet of boats, often numbering 15 or more, and in the past has made up the majority of high school races. However, Teams racing – a more tactic-based race involving two teams and six boats – is becoming common too. Sailors at RHS learn both kinds of racing through drills, practice races, and “chalk talks” about strategy.

Although the team is already large, the team captains actively recruit classmates to join them on the water. Fung explains, “The best part of being a team captain is being able to watch new sailors start to understand how sailing works, and that it’s not all muscle power or hustle. Sailing is a sport requiring lots of thinking and strategy”. Summertime sailors are obvious shoo-ins for the team, but rookies are more than welcome – the team members, coaches and captains are extremely approachable, and experienced sailors solidify their own knowledge by teaching it to new sailors. Even more reassuring to new sailors is this: because of the large number of members, RHS has enough sailors to form two teams at regattas, along with extra alternates. This ensures that every team member gets experience competing, and no one sailor just warms the bench.

Sailing clearly is distinct from other sports at RHS, but shares an important similarity: a intense focus on teamwork and team values. Molly Robertson notes that sailing includes “a lot of freedom on the water as well as responsibility. It teaches sportsmanship and honesty”. Teamwork is especially important during Teams racing, where three boats must work together for the best outcome for the group – it is not uncommon for one boat to sacrifice its first or second place position for the overall good of the team. Even on its most basic level, Club 420s are a four-hands boats, so each sailor on the boat relies on their partner for success. The team is close-knit despite its size – likely due to time spent practicing and racing in smaller groups – and team captains run practices and take beginners under their wings. Perhaps Clara Robertson explains it best: “Sailing is so much fun, but having a team makes it even better.”

As the four captains are seniors this year, the spring season is their last one on the team. However, they all have high hopes (and have set high standards!) for the next generation of RHS sailors. “The team will stay strong after all of this years seniors graduate, as we have a few really strong underclassmen”, Walsh predicts. Molly Robertson adds, “We have a dedicated coach and a good group of new captains who will keep the team strong and hopefully teach another round of good sailors to represent the high school.”

Filed Under:
Subscribe and get freshly baked articles. Join the community!
Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

rajbet app

rajbet india

lottoland asia

lottoland india

dafabet login

dafabet app

4rabet login

khelo24bet login

rummy gold

rummy glee

teen patti

teen patti gold

teen patti joy

teen patti master

rummy modern

andar bahar

dafabet

bonus new member

gullybet

IPLWin

IPLWin

tk88

tk88

thienhabet

thienhabet

Dbbet

Nagad88

Babu88

Six6s

Bhaggo

Elonbet